Tampax ® Menstrual Cup Full Review | Winner or Loser?

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Tampax Sizes and Models

The Tampax is a menstrual cup that is manufactured in Israel. It is made of Silicon and comes in 2 different sizes/models:
Tampax
Small
48 mm
60 mm
50 mm
10 mm
18 ml
25 ml
2.5 /5
5 /5
5 /5
Tampax
Large
55 mm
61 mm
56 mm
5 mm
30 ml
38 ml
2 /5
4.5 /5
4.5 /5
Found any errors in our measurements? Let us know!

Introduction

The Tampax Cup was launched late in 2018 and can be found online and in a couple of chain stores (in the USA).  Tampax is the first big-name, mainstream company to try their hand at a menstrual cup.  While some people felt it would give non-menstrual cup users the opportunity to learn about alternative menstrual products, others were outraged that a big company was jumping on the bandwagon for profit.

There was talk of their original cup getting some changes only months after its launch, but chatter in forums only indicated that firmness was the only difference.   This cup is unique in design and at regular cost is $40.

Photos online and on the official Tampax site show the same cup design but it is unclear if the firmness has changed.  Therefore, this review is based on their originally launched cup.

YouTube Videos

Model 1 – Tampax Menstrual Cup ‘Regular Flow’ | Review

What’s Included

When purchasing the Regular Flow Tampax Cup you will receive the shorter and narrower cup, a hard clamshell carrying case, and a welcome guide (user manual).

Who is it Meant For?

According to the company, the Regular size should be chosen if you usually use a lite, regular, or super absorbency tampon.

Those with a low to a very low cervix will find this size more comfortable.  However, the point at the base of the cup may be of some concern.  I would normally suggest a cup with a rounded base for comfort issues.

Special Features

Capacity – The Regular Flow Tampax Cup holds 25 ml to the top of the rim.  This is comparable to the capacity of other small-sized cups.

Body – This cup is “V”-shaped.  Not including the rim or the stem, the body is fairly short in length.

Stem – The stem is a solid piece of straight silicone that has two rounded sides and two flat sides.  It has four grip rings down the length of it.  The different surfaces help the user get a good grip while removing the cup.  The stem can easily be trimmed if needed by using each ring as a guide.

Although this cup is on the shorter side, it didn’t migrate any higher due to the wider rim.  If I sat or walked a certain way, the stem was low enough that I could feel the thin, sharp grip rings rubbing against me.

Rim – The rim of the Tampax Cup sets it apart from other cups on the market.  The rim flares outward into a very wide diameter.

This unique feature may keep the cup from moving upward during use, it inhibits the cup from being folded into some of the smaller insertion points and may be uncomfortable to insert and/or remove for some users.  The rim is also softer than the body of the cup which may make it difficult to open as well.

Since the regular flow cup size is narrower than the heavy flow version, I found it easier to fold, insert, and open.  However, I prefer to use a cup with a higher capacity even when I have a light flow.

Secondary Rim – While there is no secondary rim on the Tampax Cup, the wider band of the upper rim is thicker as it begins its flared area.

Grip Rings – There are five grips rings at the base of the cup.  While they are not very pronounced, they are thin which can feel sharp to some users.

Silicone Quality – The walls of the Tampax Cup feel thicker compared to many other cups.  It feels sturdy and durable.  However, it seems to stain easily and takes on a slightly yellow tint over time.

Although the color will not interfere with the cups’ ability to collect menstruation, it can still be off-putting.

Firmness – As mentioned in the first few paragraphs, it is unsure if the firmness was changed after the Tampax Cups’ original release.  The original Regular Flow cup is considered very firm with a softer rim.

Air Holes – There are four equidistant air holes located at the point where the rim starts to flare.  The air holes travel upwards with the highest point being on the inside of the cup.  These holes are medium in size and are conveniently placed so that water is forced downward during cleaning.

Seams – The only flashing or seam that can be seen is on the side of the rim.  However, this line can barely be seen or felt.

Markings – TAMPAX®1 can be found on the rim on the inside of the cup.

Colors –  translucent

Model 2 – Tampax Menstrual Cup ‘Heavy Flow’ | Review

What’s Included

When purchasing the Heavy Flow Tampax Cup you will receive the longer and wider cup, a hard clamshell carrying case, and a welcome guide (user manual).

Who is it Meant For?

According to the company, the Heavy Flow size should be chosen if you usually use a super plus or ultra absorbency tampon.

This size may also be more comfortable for those who have a medium to high cervix.

I normally prefer a large size cup for the higher capacity = longer wear time.  However, this is the first time that I’ve preferred the smaller size of any brand because of ease of use and comfort issues.

Special Features

Capacity – The Heavy Flow Tampax Cup holds 28 ml to the top of the rim.  This is comparable to the capacity of other large-sized cups.

Body – This cup is “V”-shaped.  Not including the rim or the stem, the body is fairly short in length.

Stem – The stem is a solid piece of straight silicone that has two rounded sides and two flat sides.  It has four grip rings down the length of it.  The different surfaces help the user get a good grip while removing the cup.  The stem can easily be trimmed if needed by using each ring as a guide.

Although this cup is on the shorter side, it didn’t migrate any higher due to the wider rim.  If I sat or walked a certain way, the stem was low enough that I could feel the thin, sharp grip rings rubbing against me.

Rim – The diameter of the heavy flow rim is 55 mm.  Whereas the average large cup diameter is closer to the low or mid-’40s.  This unique feature is supposed to keep the cup from moving upward during use.

The Tampax Heavy Flow Cup has one of the widest rim diameters that I’ve ever encountered.  The large diameter and thicker silicone made it hard for me to fold this cup up into a small enough point that was comfortable during insertion.  Since the rim is softer than the rest of the cup, it did not expand as easily as the body had.  After some manipulation, the rim snapped open only to hit my cervix in the process.  It gave me a jump and was uncomfortable for a bit, but it opened.

The wide diameter also made removal a little more challenging.  I never found a comfortable way to remove this cup with ease.

Secondary Rim – While there is no secondary rim on the Tampax Cup, the wider band of the upper rim is thicker as it begins its flared area.

Grip Rings – There are five grips rings at the base of the cup. While they are not very pronounced, they are thin which can feel sharp to some users.

Silicone Quality – The walls of the Tampax Cup feel thicker compared to many other cups. It feels sturdy and durable. However, it seems to stain easily and takes on a slightly yellow tint over time.

Although the color will not interfere with the cups’ ability to collect menstruation, it can still be off-putting.

Firmness – As mentioned in the first few paragraphs, it is unsure if the firmness was changed after the Tampax Cups’ original release.  The original Regular Flow cup is considered a medium/firm cup with a soft rim.

Air Holes – There are four equidistant air holes located at the point where the rim starts to flare.  The air holes travel upwards with the highest point being on the inside of the cup.  These holes are medium in size and are conveniently placed so that water is forced downward during cleaning.

Seams – The only flashing or seam that can be seen is on the side of the rim.  However, this line can barely be seen or felt.

Markings – TAMPAX®1 can be found on the rim on the inside of the cup.

Colors – translucent

Detailed User Manual

The Tampax Cup site includes a nice Cup Guide to walk you through sizing, cup basics, inserting, wearing, & removing the cup, as well as cleaning, storing, and sanitizing it.

They also offer some short instructional videos and some extra tips.

Customer Service

The Tampax site includes an area to contact them (through email) by entering your reason for writing, how they can help, and your name and email.

Ph: 1-800-523-0014 9am – 6pm EST Mon-Fri.

Alternatives to Tampax Cup

While no other cup has the same wide rim as the Tampax Cup, there are some other cups that might be easier to insert and open, or more comfortable to use.

Venus Cup – The Venus Cup small is a softer and narrower option that holds slightly more capacity than the Regular Flow Tampax Cup. It also has a round base that may be more comfortable at the vagina open than the pointed base of the Tampax.

While the large Venus Cup is still softer and narrower than the Tampax Cup, it may be too long or uncomfortable for users with a low or very low cervix. However, if your cervix can accommodate the length, the large Venus Cup holds a capacity of 47 ml. It’s a great cup specially designed for a heavy flow.

MeLuna Shorty – The “Shorty” versions of the MeLuna Cups were specifically designed for those with a medium to a low cervix. These cups don’t have a wide flared rim like the Tampax Cup, but they are on the short side and have less of a point at the base. The MeLuna also offers their cups in three different firmness levels.

Summary

Although this cup is of good quality material and has a reputable company behind it, the wide diameter of the rim can be quite intimidating.  Even avid, experienced users have found that it can be cumbersome.

The walls of this cup are thicker than most cups which cause it to be bulky and inhibit the user from creating a smaller more comfortable insertion point.

Since the diameter is wide, it has been reported to have caused some bladder pressure issues.  However, the rim is softer than the rest of the body of the cup which has also caused difficulties when trying to get it to open.

Several users with a medium to a low cervix have shared that the pointed base is uncomfortable and that grip rings both at the base of the cup and on the stem are sharp and cause chafing.

These cups are also offered in a Starter Kit.  If you are unsure of which size to try, this kit allows you to try both sizes for a lower price (per cup).

Frequently Asked Questions

How does a Tampax Cup work?

Like all menstrual cups, it may or may not create a gentle seal in the vagina canal to sit directly under or around the cervix to collect menstrual fluid.  

What is a Tampax Cup?

The Tampax Cup is a medical-grade silicone menstrual cup that collects menstrual flow.  It contains no additives, dyes, perfumes, BPA’s or latex and can be worn safely for up to 12 hours depending on how light or heavy the menstrual flow.

How do you put a Tampax Cup in?

The Tampax Cup is folded and inserted towards the tailbone. According to the company, the cup will unfold before it’s fully inserted.  They instruct that you continue to insert the cup until the stem is about 1/2 an inch (2cm) above the vaginal opening.

Where is the Tampax cup made in?

The company site claims that the Tampax Cup is made in the USA.  However, early manufacturing registration numbers for the parent company (P&G) of these cups lead us to Israel.   Whatever the case may be, the Tampax Cup as well as the facility that they are manufactured in are registered with the FDA.

Is it a ‘cheapie’ cup?

No. The Tampax Cup is made by a long-running, well-known, and reputable company.

5 Total Score

5Expert Score
Overall Score
5
8User's score
Overall Score
8
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2 Comments
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  1. Overall Score
    60

    This isn’t a bad cup really, but it’s insanely wide. It was sore removing it because it was so wide. However, I like that it is made in Israel, and I got an opportunity to support Israelis.

    + PROS: Works well for wider vaginas
    - CONS: Cost Size is too wide if you're more narrow
    Helpful(1) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  2. Overall Score
    100

    I purchased this cup in both sizes because it was $40.00 for a single cup and $60.00 for two, so to me, it made sense. I really like the Tampax cup and am happy cups are becoming more popular. The design of the Tampax cup makes the cup very comfortable. I can work out with the cup, pee, chase after a toddler and even poop and the cup stays put. Some woman have to remove any menstrual cup when going number two because the cup may slip out, but the tampax cups design (the wider rim) is designed to stay where it is or even move higher during bowel movements. I’ve had three children vaginally and use both sizes successfully. I go by flow with this cup. Both are extremely comfortable but I prefer the bigger cup on my heavy days. I have no had any leaks at all with either one of these cups. I like the firmness. It is firmer than the Diva cup which makes it pop open very nicely and creates a nice tight seal. I have a high cervix, but I would think even someone with a low cervix could use the tampax cups successfully because the wide rim would allow your cervix to sit inside of the cup without issue. It also has a very nice capacity. I change my cup every 12 hours (morning and before bed) and could go longer if I wanted to, even on my heaviest days (and I have a copper IUD and can have pretty heavy periods). All in all, the only think I don’t really like about this cup is the price. It isn’t a deal breaker for me because the cup is very high quality and works well and if spending $10/month on disposable products, I would save money by the 7th month with the Tampax cup and a menstrual cup can last up to 10 years with proper care! I have purchased more expensive cups and obviously cheaper cups, I find average to be between $20-30. Using a cup has been life changing for me. I literally forget I have my period for 12 hours at a time. I even have less menstrual cramps now.

    + PROS: Nice capacity, does not slip, comfort, easy to use.
    - CONS: Price
    Helpful(5) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this

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