Diva Cup vs. Lena Cup – Menstrual Cup Comparison









TOP PICKS
Diva Cup
Model 1 (M)
43 mm
67 mm
56 mm
11 mm
20 ml
27 ml
3.5 /5
3.5 /5
3.5 /5
5.0 /5
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Diva Cup
Model 2 (L)
45 mm
67 mm
56 mm
11 mm
25 ml
30 ml
3 /5
3 /5
3 /5
5.0 /5
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Lena Cup
Small
41 mm
71 mm
47 mm
24 mm
20 ml
25 ml
3 /5
4.5 /5
4.5 /5
5.0 /5
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Lena Cup
Large
44 mm
71 mm
51 mm
20 mm
25 ml
30 ml
3 /5
4 /5
4 /5
5.0 /5
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Lena Cup Sensitive
Small
41 mm
71 mm
47 mm
24 mm
20 ml
25 ml
2 /5
2.5 /5
2.5 /5
5.0 /5
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Lena Cup Sensitive
Large
44 mm
71 mm
51 mm
20 mm
25 ml
30 ml
2 /5
2.5 /5
2.5 /5
5.0 /5
TOP PICKS
Diva Cup
Model 0 (S)
40 mm
67 mm
56 mm
11 mm
17 ml
23 ml
3.5 /5
4 /5
3.5 /5
5.0 /5

Hi Ladies!

You’re done with sanitary pads and tampons, and finally found a product that is environmentally friendly that you can use over and over again – a menstrual cup! But, with so many choices out there, which one is truly the best for you? Let’s take a close look at two very popular choices, the Diva and the Lena menstrual cups.

The Diva Menstrual Cup

The Diva Cup originates from Canada, and hit the market way back in 2001. It’s been a reputable brand that has been registered with the FDA. They are available at big chain-stores, your local pharmacy, or chemists for around $35-$39.

It is a “V”-shaped cup with a standard rim. All of the models are the same length, which is considered on the longer side. Because of the length and tapered base, the Diva Cup would be more comfortable and easier to reach for those who have a medium to a high cervix.

The Diva Cup is offered in three different models – 0, 1 & 2. Respectfully, the model “0” has been dubbed the “teen” cup because it is very narrow, but you don’t have to be a teen to use it. The model “0” would also be a good choice for new users, and individuals who experience bladder or bowel pressure.

The model “1” has a diameter similar to other average small-sized cups (around 42mm), and the model “2” has a diameter similar to other average large-sized cups (around 47mm). The Diva Cup has no unnecessary additives, including color pigments, which means it is only offered in a standard opaque white. The Diva Cup is of medium firmness. It is widely used as a baseline when comparing the firmness of other cups.

The Lena Menstrual Cup

The USA made Lena Cup was launched in 2015, is still fairly new to the market, and is exceptionally popular. It has also kept up their FDA registration, but so far can only be found through online stores and vendors. The Lena Cup costs $25 per single cup or $40 USD for a dual pack.

The Lena Cup is offered in two different sizes – small and large, with the small being shorter of course! As mentioned above, you can also get a dual pack which contains one of each size. It is a bell-shaped cup with a flared rim. This shape and rim tend to ride up and sit higher in the vaginal fornix (space around the cervix). Because of this, the Lena Cup may be more comfortable for those who have a medium to a low cervix. The rounded base replaces some of the capacity lost by not having a longer, tapered point as the “V”-shaped cups.

The Lena Cup is offered in two different firmness levels. The original Lena Cup is considered to be a firm cup, although the rim is slightly softer than the body. They also offer a “sensitive” version which is a soft-medium, and is suggested if you experience any bladder or bowel pressure or sensitivity.

The Lena Cup has a range of bright colors available in pink, aqua, and purple, along with the standard opaque white.

*Color pigments should also be FDA compliant.

How to decide which cup is better for you and your body?

While there is a wide range of cups to choose from on the market, there are several factors that may play a key role in which cup is right for you. Let’s take a look at some of these:

1. Cervix Height

Knowing the location and getting an approximate measurement/height of your cervix can narrow down a large portion of the choice of cups that are appropriate for you. This is important for reasons of comfort, or to make sure the cup is easy to reach when you need to remove it.

“V”-shaped cups, like the Diva Cup, taper to a point, and usually have more length to them. The standard rim helps the cup from settling as high into the vaginal fornix as a flared rim would. This shape will make it easier to reach the cup for individuals with a high cervix. Those with a low cervix may find this cup too long to be comfortable, and may not even be able to insert the cup completely.

Bell-shaped cups, especially those with a flared rim like the Lena Cup, tend to ride up and sit higher in the vaginal fornix – the space around the cervix. The base of these cups is typically rounded, which helps give it a shorter length, as well as adding back some of the capacity due to shortening. For individuals with a low cervix, this shape and rim are more comfortable.  People with a high cervix may find it difficult to reach when the cup needs to be removed, which can be a problem.

2. Bladder & Bowel Sensitivity

If you’ve experienced bladder and/or bowel sensitivity in the past with any type of vaginal penetration, you’ll likely want a soft or medium firmness as opposed to a very firm cup. In the case of the Diva Cup vs the Lena Cup, the Lena Cup Original is the firmer of the two. However, the Lena Cup Sensitive would be the softest.

3. Physical Activity

In many cases, those who perform strenuous activities or workouts find that a firmer cup helps keep leaks at bay. If you have bladder and/or bowel sensitivity, opt for the Diva Cup over the Lena Cup, or continue your search for a softer bell-shaped cup if you have a medium to low cervix.

4. Cup Capacity

While neither of these cups are considered high capacity, the Lena Cup may ride up, and sit higher in the vaginal fornix, and the cervix will sit deeper into the cup. This can compromise some of the capacity and cause premature leaking for those with a heavy menstrual flow. You may want to continue your search for a bell-shaped cup with a higher capacity if you have a medium to a low cervix. The good news is, there are some other cup options that may interest you.

5. More Things to Consider

A few other things that might help narrow down your selection, are price and accessibility. Although you may have found the perfect cup, it may be too costly for your budget, or not available either in your country or by shipment.

  • As previously mentioned, the average cost for a single Diva Cup is $35-$39 USD. While the Lena Cup costs $25 USD for a single cup or $40 USD for a dual pack.
  • In the case of the Diva Cup vs. Lena Cup, you’re in luck! It seems both of these cups are available in, or can be shipped to, most countries.

Comparison Videos

More Cup Options

Similar options to the Lena Cup:

  • Venus Cup – The Venus Cup does not have a flared rim, so if you have a very low cervix, even the small size may still be a tad too long for you, but it allows the cervix to sit inside of the cup without compromising any of the capacity. The small Venus Cup is only 1 mm longer than the small Lena Cup, while the large Venus Cup is 5 mm longer than the large Lena.

    The Venus Cup is softer than the Lena Original but firmer than the Lena Sensitive, making it a perfect choice!
  • MyCup – The MyCup sizes small and large have a slightly wider diameter than the Lena Cup, and the body is more rounded. Although the length of the MyCup isn’t too far off of the measurements of the Lena Cup, these two features give the MyCup more capacity over the Lena Cup. The firmness is comparable to the Lena Original.
  • Sckoon Cup – While the large Sckoon Cup and Lena Cup are about the same length, the small Sckoon Cup is shorter by approximately 7mm. Although it doesn’t seem like much, it could make a big difference in fit and reach. These two cups hold about the same capacity, and the Sckoon Cup is softer than the Lena Original but slightly firmer than the Lena Sensitive.

Similar options to the Diva Cup:

  • Casco Cup – While the Casco Cup is very similar in shape and size to model “1” and “2” of the Diva Cup, it is softer, and therefore may be more comfortable for those with a sensitive bladder or bowel.
  • Eva Cup (USA) – The Eva Cup from the USA (not Italy) has a soft body with a wider secondary band. The wide band spreads out pressure points and helps the cup open easily. The soft body also eases extra pressure for a sensitive bladder or bowel. Unlike the Diva Cup, the smaller Eva Cup is shorter than its large sidekick.
  • Monthly Cup – The Monthly Cup is slightly shorter than the Diva Cup, but has a rounder body which allows more capacity. The firmness between the rims are also very similar, but the body of the Monthly Cup is softer, which may ease any extra pressure.

 

Well ladies, I hope that this Diva vs. Lena Cup checklist helps you determine or narrow down which cup might be the right overall best fit for you, or give you some other options that may be more of what you’re looking for.

Best of luck! ??

FAQ

What is a cervix?

The cervix is the narrow passage forming the lower end of the uterus.

How do I clean a menstrual cup while having my period?

When you take it out, simply use warm water and gentle soap, with no chemicals, that is safe for your vagina.

What is the best way to know which cup is right for me if I have never used a cup before?

Generally, the best advice is to use the cup that regularly stands out as the number 1 choice compared to other choices, and order a dual pack. That way, you will know which size is perfect for you!

 

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